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Anisotropic MOFs may open new application doors

By Paul Grad |

Porous crystals called metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have an extremely large surface area, as well as a large number of pores situated in an extremely small space that offer room for “guest” molecules. Such characteristics make MOFs potentially useful for gas storage or as molecular sieves for the separation of chemicals. Normally, MOFs will grow with random orientation and position. Now a multinational team has succeeded in growing MOFs with an unprecedented controlled orientation and alignment of the crystals, opening up the possibility of many new applications for MOFs. Controlling the growth creates new properties for the MOFs that can be explored for use in microelectronics, optics, sensors and biotechnology. The team is led by professor Paolo Falcaro of the University of Adelaide (Adelaide, Australia; www.adelaide.edu.au) and the Technical University of Graz (Austria; www.tugraz.at) and professor Masahide Takahashi of Osaka Prefecture University (Sakai, Japan; www.osakafu-u.ac.jp), with participants from the University of Adelaide, Monash University (Melbourne, Australia; www.monash.edu), the Australian CSIRO (www.csiro.au) and Osaka Prefecture University. Various substances can be infiltrated into the pores of the crystals…
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A partnership between materials company NuMat Technologies (Skokie, Ill.; www.numat-tech.com) and The Linde Group (Munich, Germany; www.the-linde-group.com) is set to…

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