ID
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Forward Osmosis Last month, Bioindustrial Innovation Canada (BIC; Sarnia, Ont.;…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGENGINEERING PRACTICEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment

Making amine-based CO2 adsorbents more stable

By Paul Grad |

Amine-containing solids have been investigated as promising adsorbents for CO2 capture, but existing amine-containing adsorbents degrade by oxidation, making them unreliable for repeated CO2 adsorption-desorption cycles over a long period. The low stability requires the continuous addition of fresh adsorbents, which significantly increases the cost of CO2 capture.

Now researchers from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST, Daejeon, South Korea; www.kaist.edu), led by professor Minkee Choi, have discovered that the very small amount of metal impurities — iron and copper — present in the amine accelerate the oxidative breakdown of the adsorbent. They propose the use of a chelator, which suppresses the activation of the impurities. Laboratory studies showed that the proposed method renders the adsorbent up to 50 times slower in its activation rate due to oxidation, compared with conventional polyethyleneimine (PEI)/silica adsorbents.

The researchers developed an extra-stable adsorbent by combining two strategies. First, PEI was functionalized with 1,2-epoxybutane, which generates tethered 2-hydroxylbutyl groups. Secondly, chelators were pre-supported onto a silica support to deactivate the metal impurities that catalyze amine oxidation. The resulting adsorbent exhibited a minor loss of CO2 working capacity (8.5%), even after 30 days aging in O2-containing fluegas at 110°C. This corresponds to a 50-times-slower deactivation rate than that of conventional PEI/silica, which exhibited a complete loss of CO2 uptake capacity after the same treatment.

The researchers believe their work represents an important breakthrough for the commercial implementation of those adsorbents.

Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
ABB Ability™ technology to transform BASF rotating equipment into intelligent machinery and improve uptime and reliability
Detect and correct anomalies early in your batch processes
ABB at ACHEMA 2018
The Future of Project Execution
Digitalization: What does it deliver today… and tomorrow?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat