ID
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGE
Dorothy_LozowskiStarting strong
Last month, the American Chemistry Council (ACC; www.americanchemistry.com) issued its…
COVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineTesting tide power
A counter-rotating propeller technology that is being developed to harness…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENGINEERING PRACTICEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGERYOU AND YOUR JOBEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment

Solution mining technique improves potash yields

By Scott Jenkins |

A new patent-pending solution-mining technique known as SMER (selective mining with enhanced recovery), developed by Innovare Technologies Ltd. (Carlyle, Sask.; www.innovaretechnologies.ca), can increase yields of potash (potassium chloride; KCl) and achieve lower operating and capital costs compared to traditional potash solution-mining methods. Potash is a global commodity chemical used primarily as a fertilizer to improve crop yields. It can be found naturally as pure KCl, known as the mineral sylvite, but is most often found as a dual ore deposit with sodium chloride (NaCl) and is known as sylvinite. Potash is typically recovered by primary solution mining, where heated water is injected into a drilled mine cavern to dissolve both KCl and NaCl. KCl is isolated from the returning brine solution with an evaporative crystallizer. Typically, recovered NaCl is stockpiled on the surface and can become an environmental legacy. In conjunction, caverns in which primary mining has been performed also undergo secondary mining with brine that contains a depleted level of KCl and a close-to-saturation concentration of NaCl. This secondary-mining technique is designed to leave NaCl behind, while extracting the desired KCl. Innovare’s SMER…
Related Content
Testing tide power
A counter-rotating propeller technology that is being developed to harness the energy from tidal currents has been field tested off…
A promising zeolite for ethylene separation
Scientists from ExxonMobil (Irving, Tex.; www.exxonmobil.com) and the Institute of Chemical Technology (ITQ; Valencia, Spain; http://itq.upv-csic.es) have discovered a new…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Trinseo Digitizes Control System Migration Projects to Achieve Fast ROI
Purdue University Saves $400,000 Annually with Local Vacuum Networks
Bag filter Housings/Vessels
Innovative Backwashable Media Filter
Automated Vertical Tower Filter Press

View More

Live chat by BoldChat