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A new filter mesh with reduced erosion — by design

By Gerald Ondrey |

Porometric mesh is a new weave mesh designed by GKD-USA, Inc. (Cambridge, Md.; www.gkdusa.com) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations (photo), in a study aimed at reducing erosion and abrasion caused by sand in oil-and-gas pipelines. Porometric mesh has a very open, 3-D mesh construction that, while maintaining a constant volumetric flowrate, reduces local pore velocity by up to 40% compared to conventional filtration meshes, with throughput increasing by a similar factor, says the company. With a pore size of 150µm, this new mesh type achieves an air permeability of 4,800 L/m2/s at a pressure of 200 Pa. In contrast, a plain weave with the same pore size has a permeability level of only 2,500 L/m2/s at 200 Pa. So, at the same volumetric flowrate, the more-open structure of the new mesh almost halves the local pore velocity. The lower maximum pore velocity results in lower wear of the filter material from particles. GKD[/caption] Currently, the company offers Porometric mesh with a geometric pore opening of 150 and 175µm, and the mesh is now undergoing practical tests that are confirming the values calculated in the simulation. The company is also working on a Porometric mesh family with pore sizes between 20 and 750µm.
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