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Comment Processing & Handling

A new material for large-scale energy storage devices

By Paul Grad |

Researchers from the Australian National University (ANU; Canberra; www.anu.edu.au), and the University of New South Wales (Sydney, Australia; www.unsw.edu.au) claim to have obtained a temperature- and frequency-independent colossal permittivity (CP) material with a low dielectric loss, making it strikingly superior to typical existing CP materials. “We believe this work breaks through the logjam associated with the practical development of CP materials for use in large capacitors and high-energy-density storage devices, as well as providing important new strategies for the design and development of new classes of such materials,” says professor Yun Liu of ANU’s Research School of Chemistry. Of the many methods employed to develop materials with those properties, one approach is to use localized lattice defect states that can also lead to high-dielectric permittivity, but with acceptable dielectric loss and low frequency and temperature dependence. “The idea is to create local electron-pinned defect-dipoles within a parent metal oxide in such a way that the pinned electron is localized within a few metal-oxygen polyhedra. As these electrons have significantly more space for displacement than atomic electrons,…
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