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Comment Processing & Handling

A new photocatalyst for VOC destruction

By Tetsuo Satoh |

A process for manufacturing fine particles of titanium dioxide that exhibits a high level of photocatalytic activity has been developed by Showa Titanium Co., a subsidiary of Showa Denko K.K. (SDK, Tokyo; ww.sdk.co.jp). The product has been developed in collaboration with professor Bunsho Ohtani at Hokkaido University with support from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO, Kawasaki, Japan; www.nedo.go.jp). Showa Titanium is now conducting tests for volume production at its pilot plant, aiming to commercialize the product by the end of 2013. When used as photocatalyst, these titanium-oxide particles cause strong oxidation and reduction reactions in the presence of ultraviolet (UV) light, thereby decomposing a variety of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The TiO2 particles also exhibit ultra hydrophilicity, causing water to spread as a thin film, a property that makes the material useful for solar-powered air purification in applications such as antifogging window glass and antifouling coatings for exterior surfaces of buildings. Although it is well known that the photocatalytic properties of TiO2 improve as the particle size gets smaller, conventional methods for making fine TiO2 particles often…
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