I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment PDF

A silver-based antimicrobial

By Chemical Engineering |

Pure Bioscience (El Cajon, Calif.; www.purebio.com) has developed silver dihydrogen citrate (SDC), the first antimicrobial approved by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA; Washington, D.C.) in 30 years, with applications in the pharmaceutical, personal care, household, food and textile markets. Pure produces both a pre-formulated, ready-to-use product, and an SDC concentrate for addition to other products. It is highly effective as a hard-surface cleaner, killing the Norovirus, MRSA, VRE, E. coli, some influenza viruses, as well as other dangerous bacteria and viruses. It kills bacteria within 30 s and has a residual killing capability of up to 24 h after application, unlike other antimicrobials that disappear upon evaporation. The technology consists of stabilized ionic silver in a solution of organic acid that is the product of an electrolytic process. The stable bond of the silver ion in SDC allows the Ag+ to remain in solution while still making it bio-available. Microorganisms view the acid solution as a food source, allowing the pico-scale SDC molecule to enter as well. The Ag+ then denatures the microbes DNA, stopping its ability to replicate and killing it. Aqueous SDC is colorless, odorless, tasteless and non-caustic,…
Related Content
A less expensive way to make graphene
A team from RMIT University (Melbourne, Australia; www.rmit.edu.au) and the National Institute of Technology, Warangal (Warangal, India; www.nitw.ac.in) has developed…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat