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Comment Separation Processes

A sludge-treatment process makes its commercial debut

By Chemical Engineering |

A chemical-treatment process, called Kemicond, that reduces the volume and odor of sludge has been commercialized by its developer Kemitra Kemi AB Kemwater (Helsingborg, Sweden; edlinks.chemengonline.com/6515-532). The first commercial application – a system for Käppala Association (Stockholm, Sweden) that treats sewage water from nine municipalities in northern Stockholm – started up in April; approximately 40,000 m.t./yr of dewatered sludge is separated in the treatment process. In late June, Oulun Vesi, the water utility in Oulu, Finland, selected Kamira’s process for its Taskila wastewater treatment plant. In the patented Kemicond process, sewage sludge is treated with sulfuric acid (pH 4) just before conventional dewatering. Metal salts, such as iron phosphates and hydroxides are dissolved, and water-retentive gel structures are broken down, releasing entrapped water. Addition of a strong oxidant, such as hydrogen peroxide, converts the dissolved Fe+2 into Fe+3, which captures the dissolved phosphate ions as ferriphosphate; this action facilitates the dewatering of the sludge, says Kemira. The strong oxidizing environment also disinfects the sludge. Kemicond sludge can be dewatered in a screw press, a centrifuge,…
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