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Adiabatic-Temperature Rise: An Awkward Calculation Made Simple

By Subin Hada & B. Keith Harrison, University of South Alabama |

    Predicting an adiabatic-temperature rise is useful to chemical engineers for a number of purposes. One use is with combustion reactions whereby it is useful for determining the adiabatic-flame temperature. The adiabatic-temperature rise can be calculated for any reaction of interest, and thus it is often useful in the analysis and design of reactors. The adiabatic-temperature rise is also useful to evaluate reaction hazards. In such cases, possible hazardous reactions are evaluated as part of a safety assessment. It is even possible to postulate possible decomposition reactions for chemicals and calculate an adiabatic-temperature rise as a predictor of a possible decomposition-reaction hazard [1]. Unfortunately, calculating the adiabatic-temperature rise conventionally requires a tedious iterative solution, which is cumbersome to do by hand. There are software products available, such as popular commercial flowsheet-simulation programs that do this calculation quite nicely. However, such software packages are quite expensive and are not readily available to many practicing chemical engineers. Because of this, we present here a means of performing this calculation that makes use of much less-expensive technical software.…
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