I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment Business & Economics

An emissions-free recycling machine that converts auto scrap into fuel

By Chemical Engineering |

Global Resource Corp. (GRC; West Berlin, N.J.; edlinks.chemengonline.com/6897-534) is commercializing a technology that converts auto shredder residue (ASR) into combustible gases, liquid fuels and scrap metal using microwaves. The use of microwaves to achieve this goal has been attempted in the past, but GRC is one of the first to succeed at an economically viable level, says GRC’s chief engineer Hawk Hogan. Unil now, the technology was kept in house for research and development, but last month GRC sold its first commercial Hawk-10 (high-frequency, attenuating-wave kinetics) unit to Gershow Recycling (Long Island, N.Y.), which will use it to recycle ASR. ASR — a product of the scrap industry containing plastics, rubber, wood, paper, fabrics, glass, sand and metals — is normally landfilled. The Hawk 10 will allow Gershow to recover more metal from materials that were difficult to scrap in the past, allowing them to reduce landfill waste by 65%. In practice, Hawk 10 uses microwaves of a specific, patent-pending frequency to “excite” hydrocarbons (HCs) in the ASR. This selective heating — the same principle used by household microwave ovens, which heat food by “exciting” water molecules…
Related Content
‘Green’ chemistry winners
The challenge to create more sustainable and environmentally friendly processes and products is one that many individuals and companies are…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat