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Australians move to supply vanadium for redox flow batteries

By Paul Grad |

Two Australian companies — Australian Vanadium Ltd. (AVL; www.australianvanadium.com.au) and TNG Ltd. (both Perth; www.tngltd.com.au) — are now able to produce commercial-grade vanadium electrolyte for use in vanadium redox-flow batteries (VRFBs). Those batteries are increasingly gaining favor, primarily for grid-scale energy storage applications (Chem. Eng. September 2016, pp. 14–20; www.chemengonline.com/redox-flow-batteries-charge-forward). AVL is sourcing its vanadium from its Gabanintha project in Western Australia. The company has just received a vanadium-electrolyte pilot plant from C-Tech Innovation Ltd. (Chester, U.K.; www.ctechinnovation.com), and is marketing VRFBs in Australia through a distribution agreement with Gildemeister Energy Solutions GmbH (Würzburg, Germany; www.energy.gildemeister.com). TNG is sourcing its vanadium from its Mount Peake vanadium-titanium-iron project in the Northern Territory. The company has produced high-purity vanadium electrolyte for the first time using vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) from that project. TNG will apply its Tivan process, designed primarily for extracting vanadium, preferably as vanadium pentoxide from a titano-magnetite ore body, which contains iron, titanium and vanadium.…
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