I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment Processing & Handling

Bacteria engineered to make gasoline

By Paul Grad |

Short-chain hydrocarbons have been produced for the first time by microbial fermentation by a research team from the Dept. of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST; Daejeon, South Korea, www.kaist.ac.kr), led by Prof Sang Yup Lee. There have been reports of the production of long-chain hydrocarbons, consisting of 13 to 17 carbon atoms, suitable for replacing diesel fuel, through metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli. However, there have been no reports on the microbial production of short-chain hydrocarbons as a possible substitute for gasoline. The team has developed strains of E. coli capable of producing short-chain hydrocarbons suitable for use as gasoline by engineering fatty acid biosynthesis and degradation pathways. The team engineered the microbes fatty acid metabolism to provide fatty acid derivatives that are shorter than normal intracellular fatty acid metabolites. The strategies used include the following: screening of enzymes associated with the production of fatty acids; engineering of enzymes and fatty acid biosynthesis pathways to concentrate carbon flux toward short-chain fatty acid production; converting short-chain fatty acids to their corresponding…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat