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Bio-based adsorbent material removes PFAS compounds from water

By Scott Jenkins |

Per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) have been widely used for high-performance fire-fighting and in the manufacture of durable goods for their chemical inertness, non-stick properties and fire resistance. They have also raised health concerns because they do not degrade in the environment, and can accumulate in the body with continued exposure. CustoMem (London, U.K.; www.customem.com) has introduced a new method to treat PFAS from water, using its CGM, a novel bio-based adsorbent material that can selectively capture micropollutants of interest. As its first application, CGM has been optimized to capture several PFAS compounds, including perflourooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) but can also be used in other applications, such as groundwater remediation, industrial wastewater and point-of-use treatment. CGM is based on modified cellulose repurposed from agricultural waste. CGM is seen as a complement to granulated activated carbon (GAC), which is used to remove PFAS from water, but which has performance limitations, particularly for shorter-chain PFAS species, explains Shayne Petkiewicz, CustoMem business development manager. PFAS captured by the CGM material can be recovered, and the adsorbent…
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