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Ceramic-membrane technology simplifies steam methane reforming

By Gerald Ondrey |

A new type of steam-reforming system that produces — in a single step — purified, compressed hydrogen from methane has been developed by a team of scientists from CoorsTek Membrane Sciences AS (Oslo; www.coorstek.com), the University of Oslo (both Norway; www.uio.no) and the Institute of Chemical Technology (Valencia, Spain; http://itq.upv-csic.es). In a laboratory-scale system, the so-called protonic membrane reformer (PMR) has been shown to achieve complete conversion of CH4 into two separate streams: wet CO2 and H2 with impurity levels of less than 4 parts per million (ppm) — clean enough for fuel-cell operation. The system has an overall energy efficiency of more than 87%. As described in a recent issue of Nature Energy, the PMR is a tubular electrochemical cell with a proton-conducting electrolyte (BZCY: BaZr0.8-x-yCexYyO3-δ) sandwiched between two porous electrodes of BZCY and Ni. Methane and steam pass through the center of the reformer tube at a temperature of 700–850°C and a pressure of 5–30 bars. By applying a voltage across the electrolyte, H2 is selectively extracted from the inner reforming chamber by migrating through the proton-conducting membrane to generate pure H2 on the other side of the membrane. The…
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