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Chementator: A process that requires less energy to treat sludge efficiently  

By Edited by Gerald Ondrey |

A new activated-sludge-treatment process that promises to slash energy consumption is being developed by Sanki Engineering Co., Ltd., (Tokyo, www.sanki.co.jp), in cooperation with Ebara Corp., (Tokyo) and Touhoku University (Sendai, all Japan), and the support of NEDO (New Energy & Industrial Technology Organization; Kawasaki). The process features an innovative downflow tower equipped with hanging "sponges" (DHS, downflow hanging sponge) downstream of a conventional upflow, anaerobic-sludge blanket (UASB) process. Although conventional UASB technology reduces the volume of sludge while recovering energy in the form of biogas, the discharged water from a stand-alone UASB may not meet the local regulations regarding biological oxygen demand (BOD). Therefore, an aerobic-treatment step — with an energy-consuming blower — is often added downstream of the UASB. The new process is able to meet emission regulations without requiring a blower, thereby reducing energy consumption by up to 70%, says Sanki Engineering. In the DHS, specially designed sponges of polyurethane are efficiently packed in a plastic, cylindrical downflow tower, which operates with ambient air (no blower). These sponges hold water and microbes…
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