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Chementator: Nanoscopy  

By Chemical Engineering |

The Technical University of Denmark (Lyngby; edlinks.chemengonline.com/5826-552) has received a grant from the A. P. Møller and Chastine McKinney Møller Foundation to develop the world’s most powerful miocroscope. The so-called environmental transmission electron miocroscope is said to be five time more powerful than existing research microscopes currently in operation. The device, which is expected to see 3D details of atoms (0.07-nm resolution, or the equivalent of half a carbon atom) will be used for research at DTU’s Center for Nanotechnology. The “Center for Electron Nanoscopy” is expected to be ready next year.   Click here for a full pdf version of the Chementator Section  
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