I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
PDH catalyst Last month, Clariant's Catalyst business (Munich, Germany; www.clariant.com)…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGENGINEERING PRACTICEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Pumps
Self-priming, liquid-ring pumps enable hygienic operation The CFS AS/ASH Series…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment Water Treatment

A continuous biotreatment process that degrades phenol in wastewater

By Chemical Engineering |

Although there are several ways to reduce the phenol concentration in industrial effluent, they each have drawbacks. Chemical treatment, such as adsorption and stripping, is fast but expensive, and the chemical degradation of phenol leads to the formation of toxic intermediates. On the other hand, biological treatment is economic and leads to complete mineralization of phenol, but the technique has been mainly limited to batch operations. There have been few studies involving a continuous phenol-degradation process by mixed cultures. Now, a study by professors Bhaswati Chakraborty and Srabanti Basu from the Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, (Anandapur, Kolkata City, India; www.heritageit.edu) compared the performance of a co-current and a counter-current continuous, packed-bed reactor (continuous reactor packed with solid waste) in degrading phenol by a mixed consortium of bacteria isolated from the East Calcutta wetlands. The degradation rates and removal efficiencies of phenol by soil bacteria from East Calcutta wetlands under various mean hydraulic retention times, air flowrates and temperatures were observed and processes were optimized for both co-current and counter-current conditions. The researchers…
Related Content
Removing PFAS from wastewater
A new low-cost, safe and environmentally friendly method for removing polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) from water has been developed by…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Quadruple Sensor Lifetime with a Retractable Housing
Minimizing Explosion Risk Where Other Solutions Cannot
Minimizing Corrosion with Fast, Robust Gas Analysis
Lower Measurement Point Costs with Automatic pH Sensor Cleaning
Reduce the Risk of Corrosion in Fertilizer Production

View More

Live chat by BoldChat