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Comment Separation Processes

Continuously cleaned filters for challenging water streams

By Mary Page Bailey |

A new self-cleaning filter from Spiral Water Technologies Inc. (San Rafael, Calif.; www.spiralwater.com) can efficiently treat water with 25,000 mg/L total suspended solids (TSS). According to Spiral Water CEO Ashwin Gulati, the filters use much less energy — reportedly just 10% of traditional filters’ energy requirements — due to the negligible pressure drop made possible by the filter’s automatic, self-cleaning mechanism wherein debris is continuously removed from the filter elements by a motorized spiral brush. Other filters may have pressure drops as high as 30 psi, which can introduce higher energy consumption and may require booster pumps or backwash functionality. Gulati explains how the filter operates: “Dirty feed water enters on the top, flows down through the distributors, and the spiral brush pushes the dirt down into a purging chamber, which can be automated, while simultaneously moving clean water out.” There is also potential for the motor at the filter’s top to be run on solar power, says Gulati. In addition to keeping the filter clean at all times, the fluid dynamics of the movement of dirt into the purge chamber are key in ensuring the filter’s effectiveness for treating waters with extremely high…
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