I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chementator Briefs
Natural wax coating Researchers from Aalto University (Finland; www.aalto.fi) have…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment Processing & Handling

Cut O2-production costs in half with this PSA technology

By Tetsuo Satoh |

A high-temperature pressure-swing-absorption (HT-PSA) process that reduces energy consumption by up to 50% compared to conventional PSA technology is being developed by Tokyo Gas Co. (Tokyo, Japan; www.tokyo-gas.co.jp), with support from the New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO). The HT-PSA process uses a perovskite-type oxide absorbent. Oxygen is separated from pressurized air by absorption, and then recovered by desorption under vacuum and a temperature of 600°C. From 2011–2013, the company has operated a pilot plant with O2-production capacity of 5 Nm3/h. The results of the testing showed that the newly developed perovskite-type oxide absorbent can be used continuously for nine months (about 160,000 cycles of O2 adsorption and desorption) at temperatures above 600°C. Heat recoveries of more than 95% were achieved through a combination of heat-storage materials and other procedures. The company estimates that the technology can be scaled up to capacities of more than 1,000 Nm3/h of O2, with production costs of 0.2 kWh/Nm3 — about half the energy needed by conventional PSA technology. Under a three-year program started this year, Tokyo Gas and NEDO aim to develop a 500-Nm3/h demonstration…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Improving chemical production processes with IIoT and AI technologies
New filtration technology for highly corrosive media
PTA production: Lowering OPEX without compromising on quality
Sure that zero means zero in your zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) process?
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions

View More

Live chat by BoldChat