I D
× COMMENTARYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
‘Green’ steelmaking Seamlessly following the successful completion of the GrInHy…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Analyzers
A proportional level-output detector for pilot plants The Dynatrol CL-10GP…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment Processing & Handling

Demonstration of a new CO2-methanation process

By Tetso Satoh |

The first phase of a study on the feasibility of producing methane from CO2 has been completed by Hitachi Zosen Corp. (Tokyo; www.hitachizosen.co.jp) and Daiki Ataka Engineering Co. (Daiki Ataka) a subsidy of Hitachi Zosen, in collaboration with PTT Exploring and Production Public Co. (Thailand). The companies have been collaborating since 2012 to develop a methanation process to convert CO2, which is generated during natural gas extraction, into CH4. The process uses a nickel-based catalyst — developed by Daiki Ataka and Koji Hashimoto, professor emeritus of Tohoku University — and H2 from electrolysis of water using renewable energy sources, such as wind or solar. The tests have been performed on an integrated tubular-reactor system (5-m long tubes) with a production capacity of 1,000 Nm3/h. When operated at the relatively low temperature of 200°C, the system achieved a H2 conversion of 99.3% — claimed to be the highest in the world (90% conversion for existing high-performance methanation catalysts). The new catalyst contains no rare-earth metals, such as ruthenium, which is used in conventional methanation catalysts. Over the next three years, the companies plan to scale up the process in Phase II. Earlier…
Related Content

Mettler Toledo

Protect Your Turbines from Silica with a Low Maintenance Analyzer

Silica in boiler feedwater can lead to unplanned shutdowns and extra maintenance. A major Spanish fertilizer producer has switched to a METTLER TOLEDO silica analyzer. Discover the benefits of this change.

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
3 Reasons to Automate Sensor Cleaning
Protect Your Turbines from Silica with a Low Maintenance Analyzer
Your Off-line pH Measurements Might Be Misleading and Costing You a Lot of Money
Reduce Explosion Risk in 2 Seconds with In Situ Oxygen Analysis
Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy in Critical Applications

View More

Live chat by BoldChat