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Technology Profile: Epichlorohydrin Production from Propylene

By Intratec Solutions |

This column is based on “Epichlorohydrin Production from Propylene – Cost Analysis,” a report published by Intratec. It can be found at: www.intratec.us/analysis/epichlorohydrin-production-cost.  Epichlorohydrin, (also known as ECH and chloromethyloxirane), is an organochlorine compound and a highly reactive epoxide that is widely used in the production of epoxy resins. Produced with purities of greater than 98%, epichlorohydrin is a clear, colorless liquid. At commercial scale, epichlorohydrin is mainly produced via chlorohydrination of allyl chloride, obtained in turn from the chlorination of propylene at high-temperature. Epichlorohydrin is mainly used in the production of bisphenol A, a raw material for epoxy resins, glycerol, and elastomers. The process The process under analysis comprises three major sections: allyl chloride reaction; propylene recovery; and epichlorohydrin (ECH) production. Figure 1 presents a simplified flow diagram. Figure 1. The diagram shows the production of epichlorohydrin from propylene and chlorine[/caption] Allyl chloride reaction. Initially, chemical-grade propylene is preheated, mixed with chlorine and fed to a reactor where the chlorination reaction is carried out. The reaction occurs…
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