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Comment PDF Environment, Health, Safety & Security

Flare Consolidation Considerations

By Chris Ng and Zubin Kumana |

Consolidating multiple flares can help mitigate emissions and maintenance Chris Ng and Zubin Kumana Siemens, Process Safety Consulting istock.com/hhakim[/caption] Many petroleum-refining and petrochemical facilities have experienced tremendous growth in recent years in response to increasing demand for fuels and chemical precursors. Due to environmental regulations and economic considerations, it is frequently more desirable to increase the throughput on an existing facility rather than to build a new plant. As shown in Figure 1, the total crude-oil processing capacity in the U.S. has increased steadily as the number of operable refineries declined over the years [1, 2]. The expansion of these facilities has typically resulted in an array of independent flare systems built to meet the requirements of specific expansion projects. Flare consolidation is one attractive solution that is based on a holistic approach to updating the existing infrastructure to meet growing demands. Integrating separate flare systems into a single flare network can be an economically and environmentally viable solution to meet challenging operational and regulatory requirements. The benefits Generally speaking, independent flare systems could be integrated…
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