I D
× COMMENTARY
Digitalization Game ChangersGame Changers
The technologies associated with the Industrial Internet of Things, and…
COVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
ANG fueling station Ingevity (North Charleston, S.C.; www.ingevity.com) has completed…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment

Gas analysis made easier for high-dust areas

By Mary Page Bailey |

A collaboration between Servomex (Surrey, U.K.; www.servomex.com) and FLO2R (Hadsund, Denmark; www.flo2r.com) has resulted in one of the industry’s first laser-based gas-analysis system for use in high-dust environments. Tunable diode laser (TDL) technology provides a much more rapid response than conventional extractive systems for gas analysis, but it historically has been infeasible for use in applications where dust is present, since TDL systems rely on light visibility, and the presence of dust can inhibit laser transmittance, says Karsten Brink Floor, managing director of FLO2R. The new Hybrid 600 system (diagram) incorporates optics that minimize light loss in dusty conditions and also a built-in air knife that protects optic elements from process gases.

gas analysis

Furthermore, dust-heavy applications typically require large ducts, and installation of laser systems is usually limited to smaller duct sizes, but Floor explains that the new Hybrid 600 system uses a unique single-flange mounting configuration that enables its setup in ducts of any size, in applications with dust loads as high as 200 g/m3. Floor envisions that the Hybrid 600 system will fulfill two critical gas-analysis needs — safety interlocking applications and emissions control.

Commercial trials of the new system were recently completed at the Aalborg Portland cement plant in Denmark, where Hybrid 600 technology was used to monitor carbon monoxide levels on two kiln lines to ensure that excessive CO volumes would not lead to explosive conditions, based on the plant’s safety interlocking limits. Key to ensuring a safe installation, according to Floor, was to determine the optimal measuring point for CO, which, in this case, was as close as possible to the CO’s origin in the pre-heater system, where dust loads may vary between 75 and 200 g/m3. Floor expects to roll out the technology into waste incinerators, power plants and clay-burning kilns in the coming months.

Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Reduce Explosion Risk in 2 Seconds with In Situ Oxygen Analysis
Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy in Critical Applications
Non-Contacting Gas Sensors Minimize the Risk of Corrosion to Plant Equipment.
5 ways to Optimize Production of Polymers and Intermediate Petrochemicals
7 Ways to Achieve Process Safety in Chemical Production

View More

Live chat by BoldChat