I D
× COMMENTARYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENGINEERING PRACTICEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Valves
Safe combustible-dust-explosion isolation Isolation is essential to protect adjoining system…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment PDF

Hydrogen Cyanide Production

By Chemical Engineering |

Hydrogen cyanide (HCN) is a chemical precursor used in the production of several industrially relevant compounds, such as adiponitrile for nylon production, methyl methacrylate for polymer manufacturing, sodium cyanide for gold recovery and for the production of methionine, which is used as a feed additive. HCN is mainly produced though the Andrussow process, named for developer Leonid Andrussow. The method involves reacting ammonia, natural gas and air over a platinum catalyst to form HCN. Alternatively, HCN can be produced by the BMA process, which uses ammonia and natural gas only. The process HCN production via the Andrussow process is depicted in Figure 1 and described below, based on information available in the literature. The process can be divided into three main areas: reaction, ammonia recovery and product purification. Reaction. Natural gas, ammonia and air are fed into the reactor, where HCN is formed through a catalytic reaction. The product stream, containing HCN and unreacted ammonia, must be cooled down to avoid HCN decomposition. This is accomplished in a waste-heat boiler located below the reactor. The waste-heat boiler generates steam that can be used elsewhere in the process. Ammonia recovery. The product stream…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Improving chemical production processes with IIoT and AI technologies
New filtration technology for highly corrosive media
PTA production: Lowering OPEX without compromising on quality
Sure that zero means zero in your zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) process?
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions

View More

Live chat by BoldChat