I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSCHEMENTATOR + Show More BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGENGINEERING PRACTICEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Valves
    A new motorized control valve for the semiconductor…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment

These magnetic ‘nanosprings’ decompose microplastics

By Paul Grad |

Microplastics — a subgroup of plastics with an effective diameter less than 5 mm — are ubiquitous pollutants. They adsorb organic and metal pollutants that are ingested by aquatic organisms, and accumulated all the way up the food chain. Using tiny coil-shaped carbon-based magnets, researchers from the University of Adelaide (Adelaide, Australia; www.adelaide.edu.au), Edith Cowan University, Curtin University (both Perth, Australia), and Guangdong University of Technology (Guangzhou, China) have developed a new way of purging water sources of such microplastics without harming nearby microorganisms. “Carbon nanosprings are strong and stable enough to break these microplastics down into compounds that do not pose such a threat to the marine ecosystem,” says Shaobin Wang, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of Adelaide. To decompose the microplastics, the researchers generated short-lived, reactive-oxygen species, which trigger chain reactions that chop the long microplastics molecules into tiny harmless segments that dissolve in water. However, reactive-oxygen species are often produced using heavy metals, such as iron and cobalt, which are pollutants in their own right. The researchers found a “greener”…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Metering gas in biogas plants
Wet process analyzer for FPD and solar cell manufacturing for semi-conductors
Fluidized bed drying and cooling for temperature-sensitive polymers and plastics
CoriolisMaster: The SmartSensor solution
The Big 6 flowmeter technologies: Where to use them and why

View More