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Nanolaminated alloys grow parts for enhanced corrosion resistance

By Mary Page Bailey |

Modumetal[/caption] By controlling material interfaces at the nano-scale, Modumetal Inc. (Seattle, Wash.; www.modumetal.com) has developed a method for creating a new class of alloys with precisely defined properties through nanolamination. In this process, a part, such as a valve or fastener, is submerged in a tank containing various metal electrolytes. Through current-controlled electric-field modulation, metal ions are deposited onto the part in specific microstructures and layers. Unlike other electric-field-modulation processes, which are based on mass-transfer control, this process modulates the composition and structure of the alloy continuously. This level of control over the alloy’s properties at the interface between the original part and the deposited layer allows for customized parts to be “grown” — a process the company likens to biological activities, such as the growth of tree trunks. The company touts corrosion resistance among the most desirable benefits of nanolamination. In partnership with various oil-and-gas companies, Modumetal has performed numerous demonstrations of specialized nanolaminated parts (including large-scale equipment, such as pumps and valves) in downhole and marine environments. In recently…
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