I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment Processing & Handling

New catalysts enable CO2-neutral olefins production via methane reforming

By Gerald Ondrey |

Today, olefins are mainly made either by naphtha cracking or by the catalytic conversion of dimethyl ether (DME), which is in-situ made from synthesis-gas- (syngas) derived methanol (methanol-to-olefin processes). Both naphtha cracking and syngas production (from steam-methane reforming; SMR) require fossil fuels to drive the endothermic reactions, resulting in considerable emissions of CO2. In an effort to reduce CO2 emissions from olefins production, BASF SE (Ludwigshafen, Germany; www.basf.com), together with industrial and academic partners, is developing an alternative route to DME that reduces the CO2 footprint by 50–70%, according to Nils Bottke, head of petrochemical catalyst research at BASF, who presented an update of this five-year research project during a BASF Research Press Conference last month in Ludwigshafen. The new route to DME is a two-step process. In the first step, syngas is made by “dry reforming” of methane — that means CO2 is used as a reagent instead of water, as in conventional SMR. As a result, this step is CO2 neutral to slightly negative, explains Bottke. In contrast, SMR releases about 350 kg of CO2 per 1,000 Nm3 of syngas. To perform dry reforming, BASF developed two spinel-type catalysts…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat