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CO2-Capture Technologies Aim to Cut Costs

By Scott Jenkins |

Despite cost hurdles, CO2-capture technologies continue to advance, driven by the critical role of CO 2 capture in achieving emissions-reduction goals Among the possible strategies for addressing climate change risks are CO2-removal approaches, including the capture of CO2 from large emitters, such as power plants and industrial facilities, and also the capture of CO2 from ambient air. These technologies have been explored for some time, and commercialized in some cases, but have yet to be deployed widely, largely because of cost issues. Driven by the importance of carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) within the overall climate change response, the field of carbon capture for storage and re-use is advancing at a rapid pace. Efforts are afoot to lower the costs associated with capturing CO2 using amine-based solvents, as well as to develop alternative CO2-capture methods and ways to utilize captured CO2. This article discusses some of the recent technological advances for CO 2 capture methods for both re-use and sequestration. CCS and climate response The Paris Climate Accord, signed in April 2016, set a goal of keeping the global average temperature rise due to greenhouse gas emissions to 2°C or less above pre-industrial levels…
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