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A new plasticizer for phthalate-free solutions in PVC

By Chemical Engineering |

With a key plasticizer, dioctyl phthalate (DOP), no longer permitted under European Union REAperstorpCH regulations after February of this year, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) compounders and processors will have to move to safer alternatives. This company is in a strong position to fill the gap with a next-generation alternative that combines high performance with ease of processing and important environmental benefits. Pevalen is a non-phthalate PVC plasticizer derived solely from aliphatic raw materials, and is suitable for a wide range of general-purpose applications. A polyol ester derived from food-approved raw materials, Pevalen is based on well-proven, reliable chemistry that is already registered under REACH. The process for obtaining food contact approval for Pevalen itself is currently underway and should be concluded in 2016. — Perstorp Holding AB, Malmö, Sweden

www.perstorp.com

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