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Comment Heat Transfer

New reactor system makes products faster, without a solvent

By Chemical Engineering |

This system, which has multiple reactors and uses microwaves for heating, has been developed by professor Yuji Wada at the Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology (edlinks.chemengonline.com/6898-543), in cooperation with Shikoku Instrument Co. (Takamatsu; edlinks.chemengonline.com/6898-544) and Sanko Kagaku Kogyo Co. (Tokyo; all Japan; edlinks.chemengonline.com/6898-545). A prototype of the system has three, 1.7-L reactors in series with a pump for feeding the reactants. Each reactor has a cooling jacket and can also be irradiated by microwaves (2.45 Ghz, 1.5 kW), via waveguides, independently from each other. As an example of the system’s performance, the research group succeeded in producing a “color developer” for heat-sensitive recording [bis(3-allyl-4-hyroxyphenyl)sulfone] by the Claisen rearrangement of bis(4-allyloxyphenyl)sulfone. Normally, such Claisen reactions are carried out in a solvent in order to remove heat from the highly-exothermic reaction. In contrast, the microwave system is able to control the temperature of each reactor to within ±1°C by regulating the microwave output and the temperature of the cooling medium — and no solvent is required. Compared…
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