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Power-to-X: Batteries Not Required

By Gerald Ondrey |

As renewable energy becomes increasingly available (and less expensive), Europeans are looking to Power-to-X as a way to couple the energy, CPI and transportation sectors Germany’s energy transition (Energiewende) from fossil-based fuels to renewables, such as solar and wind, is sparking a revolution that may change the way companies in the chemical process industries (CPI) operate in the not-to-distant future. With more than 33% of its power already supplied by renewables, and a goal to be virtually greenhouse-gas (GHG) neutral by 2050 (as outlined in the Climate Action Plan 2050, adopted November 2016), Germany is leading the charge, with many European countries joining the effort to meet the E.U.’s GHG targets set out in the Paris Agreement. With the increased emphasis on carbon-free electricity from solar and wind power generation, many different technologies are being investigated to make this fluctuating electricity source more reliable, which is essential for industrial processes. Some of the options being actively investigated are power-to-x (PTX) technologies, which are ways to store and utilize excess renewable electricity in the form of a gas or liquid (X) that can be easily transported for use in transportation and…
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