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A powerful tool to analyze MOFs

By Paul Grad |

An international team, including staff from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Kaist; Daejeon, South Korea; www.kaist.ac.kr), led by Kaist’s professor Jeung Ku Kang, has developed a technology to analyze the gas adsorption behavior of molecules of each individual pore of a metal organic framework (MOF). Existing technology is only able to measure the amount of gas molecules adsorbed by the material, without directly observing the adsorption behavior. The team developed a realtime gas-adsorption crystallography system by integrating an existing X-ray diffraction measurement device that can provide structural information and a gas adsorption measurement device. The system allows the observation of a mesoporous MOF with multiple pores. The team categorized the adsorption behavior of MOF molecules by pore type, achieving the identification of a stepwise adsorption process that was not previously possible to analyze. The team analyzed how the pore structure and the type of adsorption molecule affect the adsorption behavior to suggest what type of MOF structure is suitable as a storage material for each type of adsorption behavior. Specifically, the team used two MOFs, PCN-224 and ZIF-412 which contain two and three…
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