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Progress toward using ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for fuel cells

By Tetsuo Satoh |

In order for ammonia to serve as a hydrogen carrier, it is necessary to develop separation techniques that can reliably recover H2 from the decomposition of NH3 with sufficient purity for operating proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. A step in this direction has been achieved by a Japanese collaboration lead by Yoshitsugu Kojima at Hiroshima University (Hiroshima; www.hiroshima-u.ac.jp), in collaboration with Taiyo Nippon Sanso Corp., Toyota Motor Corp. and Showa Denko K.K. The researchers, with support from a cross-ministerial strategic innovation program (SIP), named “Energy Carrier,” have developed components needed to decompose NH3 and recover high-purity H2. Using a ruthenium catalyst supported on MgO, NH3 is decomposed in a micro-channel cracker into H2 and N2 at 500°C and 0.1 MPa, with a 99.8% conversion efficiency. The remaining NH3 concentration is reduced from 1,000 parts per million (ppm) to below 0.02 ppm using a combination of pressure-swing adsorption and a zeolite-packed absorption column, to produce H2 with 99.98% purity (NH3 <0.02 ppm, N2 <10 ppm). A net H2 recovery rate of 90% was achieved. By utilizing the heat from the cracking, a net energy efficiency of 80% was observed. The researchers believe…
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