I D
× COMMENTARY
Digitalization Game ChangersGame Changers
The technologies associated with the Industrial Internet of Things, and…
COVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
ANG fueling station Ingevity (North Charleston, S.C.; www.ingevity.com) has completed…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment PDF Environment, Health, Safety & Security

Proper Sizing and Installation for Steam System Safety Valves

By Kelly Paffel, Inveno Engineering |

Successful operation of safety valves in steam systems requires careful adherence to established industry standards for installation and design One of the most critical safety devices in a steam system is the safety valve. Figure 1 is an illustration of a typical safety valve, and Figure 2 shows a valve in context on a steam line. Safety valves protect personnel, equipment and property from potentially dangerous high temperatures and forces caused by excessive steam pressure in the steam system. FIGURE 1. A safety valve used in a steam system should meet the rigorous requirements of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel codes[/caption] FIGURE 2. A safety valve in a steam line protects against potentially dangerous situations, including excessive steam pressure and high temperatures[/caption] Steam safety valves are required by industry standards, as well as insurance and corporate mandates. Therefore, it is important that the safety valve be properly sized and installed to meet all code requirements. The code that establishes the requirements for steam safety valves is written by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME; New York, N.Y.; www.asme.org). ASME, through its committees, has published and continues to update…
Related Content
Valve World Show Preview
More than 600 exhibitors from around the world will be showcasing their products at Valve World Expo 2018, the 11th…

Mettler Toledo

Reduce Explosion Risk in 2 Seconds with In Situ Oxygen Analysis

Changing to GPro® 500 in situ TDL sensors has reduced measurement time from 20 seconds to 2, and almost eliminated analyzer maintenance.

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Reduce Explosion Risk in 2 Seconds with In Situ Oxygen Analysis
Tunable Diode Laser Spectroscopy in Critical Applications
Non-Contacting Gas Sensors Minimize the Risk of Corrosion to Plant Equipment.
5 ways to Optimize Production of Polymers and Intermediate Petrochemicals
7 Ways to Achieve Process Safety in Chemical Production

View More

Live chat by BoldChat