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A single process to handle hydraulic fracturing produced water and offgases

By Mary Page Bailey |

Two major concerns in hydraulic fracturing operations are finding efficient ways to handle the massive amount of produced wastewater, and dealing with offgases from the well. A new technology developed by Ship & Shore Environmental Inc. (Signal Hill, Calif.; www.shipandshore.com), in partnership with Hydrozonix LLC (Conroe, Tex.; www.hydrozonix.com), employs an enclosed flare to destroy the well offgases and harvests the resulting energy to evaporate wastewater. According to Mike Pawlowski, senior technical sales manager at Ship & Shore Environmental, this the first technology available to the hydraulic fracturing market for onsite evaporation of produced water. The process — called Hydroflare — works by connecting the source of well offgases to an enclosed flare burner. “The resultant heat from the flare is passed to a tower or stack, which includes spray nozzles to mist the produced water into the high-temperature discharge of the burner section,” explains Pawlowski. A conveyor is also provided to discharge any solids present in the liquid stream for solid-waste disposal. The Hydroflare technology will be especially useful for hydraulic fracturing sites that have difficulty in removing wastewater via trucks, or…
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