I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment

A step closer to making CO by artificial photosynthesis

By Tetsuo Satoh |

Researchers at Toshiba Corp. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toshiba.co.jp) have developed an artificial photosynthesis system that uses solar energy to convert CO2 and water into CO with 1.5% efficiency — the highest efficiency achieved to date. The company believes the technology has the potential for utilizing CO2 to make CO — a precursor for methanol and other chemicals normally made from petroleum- or coal-based synthesis gas. Toshiba uses a gold nanocatalyst via nanoscale structural-control technology applied to a multi-junction semiconductor that absorbs light in the visible range with high light-utilization efficiency (diagram). The company says that a wired photovoltaic (PV) cell system with cobalt oxide (CoOx) and gold nanoparticle (AuNP) catalysts promotes the reduction of CO2 to CO under simulated solar light, and that the solar-to-CO conversion efficiency achieved over 1.5% without external bias at the initial stage of the reaction. The efficiency is said to be comparable to that of some algae species. Although the efficiency falls to around 1% after 3 h, it is still higher than the 0.3% achieved by artificial photosynthesis, which Panasonic first reported using electronic materials that absorb only ultraviolet (UV) light. Toshiba…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat