I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Sulfur control Preferential Oxidation Catalysis — a new catalytic solution…
BUSINESS NEWS
Chemical Engineering MagazineBusiness News
Plant Watch Perstorp will construct new plant for sodium formate…
TECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment

Ultrafine dust has a big impact on the environment

By Paul Grad |

An international study has found that coal-fired power stations emit more ultrafine dust particles than road traffic and that those dust particles can modify rainfall patterns and can, in general, have considerable impact on the climate. The study found that filtration systems of exhaust gas on modern coal-fired power stations are the main source of ultrafine particles. Ammonia is added to the exhaust gases to convert oxides of nitrogen into water and nitrogen. However, ammonia is available at the right mixing ratio for particle formation.

The study was led by professor Wolfgang Junkermann from the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (Germany; www.kit.edu) and professor Jorg Hacker from Airborne Research Australia (Adelaide; www.airborneresearch.org.au) — a part of Flinders University (Adelaide; www.flinders.edu.au).

The study’s key findings are: Modern coal-fired power stations emit more ultrafine particles than urban road traffic; ultrafine particles can harm human health; ultrafine particles can affect rainfall distribution by increasing the condensation nuclei count; ultrafine particles can be transported in layers with high concentrations for hundreds of kilometers and then lead to localized particle events. The study also found that ultrafine particle concentrations have increased continuously since modern coal-fired power stations were commissioned.

The study involved measurement flights throughout the world in small research aircraft equipped with highly sensitive instruments measuring dust particles, trace gases, temperature, humidity, wind and energy balance.

“By redistributing rainfall events, the ultrafine particles from fossil power stations can lead to drier-than-usual conditions in some places and to unusually heavy rainfall elsewhere,” Hacker says.

With diameters of less than 100 nm, ultrafine dust particles have a huge effect on environmental processes.

Related Content
Chementator Briefs
Sulfur control Preferential Oxidation Catalysis — a new catalytic solution from Haldor Topsoe A/S (Lyngby, Denmark: www.topsoe.com) — has been…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Quadruple Sensor Lifetime with a Retractable Housing
Minimizing Explosion Risk Where Other Solutions Cannot
Minimizing Corrosion with Fast, Robust Gas Analysis
Lower Measurement Point Costs with Automatic pH Sensor Cleaning
Reduce the Risk of Corrosion in Fertilizer Production

View More

Live chat by BoldChat