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Technology Profile: Urea Production from Ammonia via a Self-Stripping Process

By Intratec Solutions |

This column is based on “Prilled Urea from Ammonia via Self-Stripping Process – Cost Analysis,” a report published by Intratec. It can be found at: www.intratec.us/analysis/urea-production-cost. Urea is a nitrogenous compound consisting of a carbonyl group attached to two amine groups. Urea plays an important role in many biological processes, but is also an important material in synthesis (for example, resins and plastics), as well as in fertilizers and animal feed. The process described is similar to Saipem’s (formerly Snamprogetti) self-stripping process, based on formation of ammonium carbamate from liquid NH3 and gaseous CO2, followed by dehydration of the ammonium carbamate to urea. Figure 1 presents a simplified flow diagram of this process. Figure 1. This diagram shows prilled urea production from ammonia via a self-stripping process[/caption] Reaction. Initially, CO2 and a liquid mixture of ammonia and carbamate, recovered downstream, are fed to the urea reactor, part of the high-pressure synthesis loop. Here, the ammonia and the CO2 react, yielding ammonium carbamate and urea. Stripping. The reactor effluent, containing carbamate, is fed to a falling-film stripper, where excess NH3 strips out the carbamate…
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