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Zeolite membranes to undergo large-scale testing for CO2 capture

By Tetsuo Satoh |

In late February, construction began on a test facility that will be used to demonstrate a CO2-capture process being developed by JGC Corp. (Yokohama, Japan; www.jgc.com) and Japan Oil, Gas and Metals National Corp. (JOGMEC; Tokyo; www.jogmec.go.jp). When the Texas-based facility is completed, it will operate for one year to demonstrate a zeolite-type membrane for removing CO2 from associated gas that is generated during petroleum production. The site produces 3 million ft3/d of associated gas. For the demonstration, the facility will use DDR-type zeolite membranes, which have been under development since 2008 by JGC and the ceramics producer NKG Insulators, Ltd. (Tokyo; www.ngk-insulators.com). The test will confirm the performance of the process using large-size elements (180 mm dia.; 1,000 mm length) of the DDR-type zeolite membrane. The separation process (diagram) has been jointly developed by NGK and JGC since 2008. The DDR-type zeolite membranes will be manufactured by NGK using its advanced membrane-production technology. The membranes’ “outstanding” CO2 selectivity and high-pressure resistance have been verified in tests carried out at the company’s research facility. JGC expects the process can be applied for…
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