I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical Engineering MagazineChementator Briefs
Nanofiltration Toray Industries, Inc. (Tokyo, Japan; www.toray.com) has created what…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More SHOW PREVIEWS

Comment

A waterless hydraulic-fracturing technique gets field-tested

By Scott Jenkins |

A method for using liquid CO2, rather than water, as a hydraulic fracturing fluid has been field-tested in a mid-continent oil well, and has benefited well productivity, according to developer Praxair Inc. (Danbury, Conn.; www.praxair.com). Aside from enhanced well performance, the technology is designed to relieve pressure on freshwater supplies in drought-affected areas. The patent-pending DryFrac waterless hydraulic fracturing technology depends on a proprietary process for blending proppant (specialized sand) with pressurized CO2 that is capable of controlling sand concentration before it is pumped into wells at pressures of between 4,000 and 8,000 psi. CO2 is said to be superior to water as a fracking fluid because it reduces damage to clays, and eliminates blocking of fractures that occurs with water-based fluids, allowing more gas and oil to flow out of fractures in the formation. “For these reasons, fracking with CO2 is ideal for water-sensitive or pressure-depleted wells, and those in areas where water resources are constrained,” says Mark Weise, business development director for oil and gas services at Praxair. In addition, the CO2 does not carry the same flammability risk as hydrocarbon dry-fracking fluids, such…
Related Content
A less expensive way to make graphene
A team from RMIT University (Melbourne, Australia; www.rmit.edu.au) and the National Institute of Technology, Warangal (Warangal, India; www.nitw.ac.in) has developed…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions
Up to 80% increased production rates in plastic recycling
Higher throughput and purity in sodium bicarbonate production with up to 15% less energy consumption
Help feeding nations with chemical filtering technologies
Not at the forefront of Industry 4.0?

View More

Live chat by BoldChat