I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment PDF Automation & Control

Avoiding SIL Misconceptions

By Afton Coleman, Emerson |

Engineers must refine their foundational understanding of process safety in order to avoid common misconceptions about safety instrumented systems, including safety integrity level (SIL) definitions Learnings from major industrial process accidents occurring over the past half century have driven awareness of functional safety and resulted in the development of two performance-based standards for manufacturers in the chemical process industries (CPI). These standards, introduced by the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC; Geneva, Switzerland; www.iec.ch), are known as IEC 61508 and 61511. A safety integrity level (SIL) is utilized as a measurement of required risk-reduction targets, as well as a way to represent achieved risk reduction. Although the functional safety standards have been in existence for many years, there are many common misconceptions around industry standards, as well as around the concept of SILs themselves.   Introduction to functional safety Safety, in its most basic form, can be defined as freedom from unacceptable risk. Risk is a function of the likelihood of an incident occurring combined with its resulting consequence — specifically, a personal injury, loss of life or damage to the environment…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Video - CoriolisMaster
Video - Do you really need a thermowell?
The influence of IIoT in the dewatering process step of pigment production
The Big 6 level measurement technologies, where to use them and why
Top five technologies for drying in chemical applications

View More