I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chementator Briefs
Natural wax coating Researchers from Aalto University (Finland; www.aalto.fi) have…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUSNEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment PDF Processing & Handling

Chementator: Borrowing from aviation to improve compression

By Chemical Engineering |

With funding from the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE; Washington, D.C.), Ramgen Power Systems (Bellevue, Wash.; edlinks.chemengonline.com/5830-536) is developing a compact supersonic compressor that combines aspects of the shock-compression systems used in supersonic flight inlets with proven turbomachinery design practices that are used in today’s conventional axial and centrifugal compressors. “The physics associated with shock waves is proven in supersonic inlets. Now we’re proving it for stationary applications, says Ramgen president Peter Baldwin. “We’re trying to do something that hasn’t been done before.” Initially being designed to reduce the compression-related costs associated with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facilities (namely, the air compression required by the cryogenic distillation system used to produce oxygen for coal gasification, and the compression of the downstream CO2 in the turbine exhaust), the Ramgen compressor has corresponding implications for the development of more-efficient, lower-cost compression for other industrial applications, too, says Baldwin. For CO2 compression requiring 100:1 pressure ratio, Baldwin says that the Ramgen supersonic compressor…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Improving chemical production processes with IIoT and AI technologies
New filtration technology for highly corrosive media
PTA production: Lowering OPEX without compromising on quality
Sure that zero means zero in your zero-liquid discharge (ZLD) process?
How separation processes profit from Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) solutions

View More

Live chat by BoldChat