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Chementator: Removing boron from drinking water

By Chemical Engineering |

Next month, Mekorot, Israel National Water Company Ltd. (Tel Aviv, Israel) will start up what is claimed as the world’s first ion-exchange system for selectively removing boron from potable water. The plant, designed and constructed by Treitel Chemical Engineering Ltd. (Tel Aviv; edlinks.che.con/5827-532), will treat 6,500 m3/d of reverse-osmosis-product water at Mekorot’s brackish water desalination plant in Kziot, reducing the boron content from 1.5–2.5 mg/L to below 0.1 mg/L. International regulations for boron in drinking water are becoming more stringent since the element has been found to be potentially harmful at concentrations greater than 0.3–0.5 mg/L, says Michael Treitel, director of Treitel Chemical Engineering. The new plant is based on Amberlite IRA743 ion-exchange resin technology, which Rohm and Haas (Philadelphia, Pa.; edlinks.chemengonline.com/5827-533) and Treitel developed about 30 years ago for removing boron from magnesium brine from the Dead Sea. Since then, Rohm and Haas has upgraded the purity of the resin, making it suitable for drinking water applications, says Treitel. IRA743 is a macroporous styrenic resin with methyl glucamine functionality. Boron in water is present as some form…
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