I D
× COMMENTARYEDITOR'S PAGECOVER STORYIN THE NEWSNEWSFRONTSCHEMENTATOR + Show More
Chemical EngineeringChementator Briefs
Self-healing adhesives Researchers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (Oak Ridge,…
Chemical EngineeringModular NGL recovery
Honeywell UOP (Des Plaines, Ill.; www.uop.com) has adapted its recycle-split-vapor…
BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILEEQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Sensors
Oxygen measurement with Ex approvals & SIL2 certification The new…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment Heat Transfer

Designing Shell and Tube Heat Exchangers: Consider Two-Phase Flow

By G.T.Polley, E.E. Vazquez –Ramirez, and M. Riesco Avila; University of Guanajuato, Mexico |

In the chemical process industries (CPI) it is relatively common to use a homogeneous two-phase flow model to predict the pressure drop through the shell-side of horizontal heat exchangers that handle two-phase mixtures. Recent experimental studies reported by HTFS [1, 2], however, have shown that this approach leads to overprediction of pressure drop and to overprediction of thermal performance. As a result, many designs are flawed and perform below expectations.   Homogeneous model vs. data Doo and others [1, 2] studied the evaporation of R134A in a TEMA AEW type heat exchanger fitted with 97 tubes of 1,240 mm length. Three different baffle arrangements were studied. In the first series of tests the unit was fitted with six vertically cut baffles (providing a horizontal side-to-side flow). The baffle pitch was 156 mm. In the second series of tests the orientation of the baffles was changed such that the flow was vertical. In the final set of tests the unit had only four baffles (with a baffle pitch of 260 mm) and flow was again side-to-side. The first step taken in the analysis was a comparison between the predictions of a “homogeneous” model for two-phase pressure-drop with the experimental measurements. For all…
Related Content
The New Face of Heat Exchangers
When it comes to heat exchangers, chemical processors have a lot to consider. The most common concerns include fouling, heat-transfer…

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Steel Belt Units for Medical Membranes
Upstream Oil & Gas: Automation intelligence from wellhead to distribution
Video - CoriolisMaster
Video - Do you really need a thermowell?
The influence of IIoT in the dewatering process step of pigment production

View More