I D
× COMMENTARYCOVER STORYIN THE NEWSCHEMENTATOR + Show More BUSINESS NEWSTECHNICAL & PRACTICALFEATURE REPORTFACTS AT YOUR FINGERTIPSTECHNOLOGY PROFILESOLIDS PROCESSINGENGINEERING PRACTICEENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEREQUIPMENT & SERVICESFOCUS
Focus on Valves
    A new motorized control valve for the semiconductor…
NEW PRODUCTS + Show More

Comment PDF

Molybdenum-oxo catalyst offers cheap route to H2 from water

By Scott Jenkins |

A novel catalyst designed by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley, Calif.; www.lbl.gov) and the University of California at Berkeley (www.berkeley.edu) has shown the ability to catalyze the electrolysis of water into hydrogen and oxygen, and is 70 times cheaper than platinum ($2,000/oz.), which has also been used to catalyze the reaction. In a recent paper in Nature, the research team reports that the catalyst does not require organic acids or other additives, and can operate in neutral water, as well as in the most abundant H2 source on earth, seawater. An inexpensive and efficient water-splitting catalyst could expand hydrogen’s role as a clean energy alternative in the future. Lead author Hemamala Karunadasa explains that the new proton reduction catalyst is based on a molybdenum-oxygen complex, and can generate hydrogen gas at the rate of 2.4 moles H2 per mole catalyst per second. These values represent lower bounds, the authors say, and “are significantly higher than any other reported metal catalyst for electrochemical hydrogen production from neutral water.” The catalyst has a pseudo-octahedral geometry, where the pentadentate ligand 2,6-bis(1,1-bis(2-pyridyl)ethyl)…
Related Content

Chemical Engineering publishes FREE eletters that bring our original content to our readers in an easily accessible email format about once a week.
Subscribe Now
Metering gas in biogas plants
Wet process analyzer for FPD and solar cell manufacturing for semi-conductors
Fluidized bed drying and cooling for temperature-sensitive polymers and plastics
CoriolisMaster: The SmartSensor solution
The Big 6 flowmeter technologies: Where to use them and why

View More