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New Piping Code for High-Purity Processes

By William M. Huitt W.M. Huitt Co. Barbara K. Henon representing Arc Machines, Inc. Vicencio B. Molina III Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. |

In the emerging and ever-expanding areas of bioprocessing, where maintaining hygienic designs and practices is of paramount importance, and semiconductor manufacturing, which has its own stringent purity requirements, there is a need to standardize the essential codes and standards that are available. The goal is to consistently achieve process systems that meet the highly refined cleanliness and cleanability requirements that these industries demand. In addition to cleanliness and cleanability requirements, process operators must integrate safety into all high-purity-design philosophies and standardization efforts. This article discusses the importance of, and need for, engineering codes and standards that govern the design of high-purity process piping systems. The focus of this article is the new Chapter X (High Purity Piping) that is found in the 2010 issue of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) B31.3 Process Piping code. This chapter deals mainly with the bioprocessing and semiconductor industries, but also includes a sub-set of bioprocessing-related industries, such as pharmaceuticals manufacturing, biofuels production, food-and-dairy production and others. Evolving purity requirements Early on (in the 1920s),…
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