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Precipitated Calcium Carbonate from Limestone

By Intratec Solutions |

This column is based on “Calcium Carbonate Production from Limestone: Cost Analysis,” a report published by Intratec. It can be found at: www.intratec.us/analysis/calcium-carbonate-production-cost. Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is a mineral that occurs naturally in chalks, limestones and marbles. Its largest use is in the pulp-and-paper industry as a filler and pigment. Other calcium carbonate applications include its use in building construction, plant and crop fertilizers, food additives, water and sewage treatment, ceramics, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The process The following paragraphs describe a carbonization process for precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production from limestone. Figure 1 presents a simplified process flow diagram, showing the main pieces of equipment. Figure 1. The process flow diagram shows precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production from limestone[/caption] Calcination. Initially, the limestone from a quarry is stored in bins. Typical extracted limestone contains about 75 wt.% of CaCO3. Mined limestone is crushed in a jaw crusher and calcined (burned) in a vertical-shaft lime kiln at about 1,000°C. In the kiln, the calcium carbonate present in the limestone decomposes into calcium oxide (CaO;…
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