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Comment PDF Environment, Health, Safety & Security

The Globally Harmonized System

By Paul Burgess, Labelmaster |

When the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) revised the U.S. Hazard Communication Law, U.S. 29 CFR 1910.1200, in May of 2012, it set off an avalanche of change in the environmental, health and safety (EH&S) circles of American industry. Virtually every manufacturing and service industry will be involved in one aspect or another of adapting its existing hazard communication system to the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for the classification and communication of chemical hazards. As you are likely aware, the law requires all affected workplaces to train their employees in the exigencies of the new hazard communication system by December 1, 2013, and ensure that their employees understand the new labeling and safety data sheets that need to be completely in place by June 1, 2016. However, the industry segments that will likely experience the greatest change are the chemical process industries (CPI). The detailed work of compiling data for publication in the new safety data sheets, and updating labeling to comply with the new standard, is just the beginning for U.S. chemical producers. The single greatest change facing the CPI in the new system is the requirement to classify chemicals into one of the newly…
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