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Comment Environment, Health, Safety & Security

This gasification process turns waste into syngas

By Paul Grad |

Construction of a large-scale waste-to-energy plant will start in the middle of next year in Port Hedland, Western Australia, and operation is scheduled to commence in the second quarter of 2015. The plant will be built by the New Energy Corp. (Perth; www.newenergycorp.com.au), and will employ low-temperature gasification technology invented and developed by Western Australian company Entech Renewable Energy Solutions Pty. Ltd. (Canning Vale, Western Australia; www.entech-res.com). The 72-MWth facility will initially process about 100,000 ton/yr, but will eventually be able to process up to 200,000 ton/yr of various mixed waste streams, including municipal solid waste (MSW), and materials such as plastic bags and wrapping, textiles, contaminated cardboard, timber packaging from construction and demolition projects, and used tires, and export 15.5 MW of power to the grid. Much of the waste would otherwise go to landfill. Entech says its technology, called WtGas, converts solid waste to syngas — a mixture of H2, CO, CH4 and CnHn hydrocarbons — that can be fired to generate energy in a process with cleaner emissions than those resulting from firing any fossil fuel. In the process (flowsheet), the waste is slow-cooked at temperatures…
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