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Comment PDF Environment, Health, Safety & Security

Seal Considerations to Reduce Fugitive Emissions

By Brian Kalfrin and Neil Slater, John Crane Inc. |

By understanding the basics of industry standards, such as API 682, plants can make great strides in controlling fugitive emissions related to equipment seals Chemicals that unintentionally leak from equipment into the atmosphere are known as fugitive emissions. These gases and vapors include volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and greenhouse gases, such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide. In 1963, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA; Washington, D.C.; www.epa.gov) Clean Air Act set guidelines regulating these emissions from industrial facilities into the atmosphere. Additionally, standards organizations, including the American Petroleum Institute (API; Washington, D.C.; www.api.org), have established test standards. The guidelines set forth by the EPA, API and other organizations are intended to help lower the negative impacts of fugitive emissions on the environment and human health. Even so, fugitive emissions remain a concern and can take a significant financial toll on manufacturers in the chemical process industries (CPI), in terms of lost product, environmental remediation costs, unplanned maintenance and downtime. Fugitive emissions can leak from various machinery sources, including valves, flanges…
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